Signpostings

Relationships in a World of Individualism

  • rWorld

    The rWorld is about more than Dale Kuehne's book Sex and the iWorld.
    The rWorld is a New England based, non-profit (in formation), that is composed of a growing number of people and organizations from many faith and ideological backgrounds worldwide. We believe that much of the fulfillment for which women and men are looking can be found by enhancing the quality of our relationships. While the individual freedom we enjoy in the West is a gift, the love and intimacy for which humans yearn will not be found in self-serving materialism or hedonism, but in a variety of healthy relationships.

    Contact us if you'd like get involved:
    scr.im/rwld

  • Dale Kuehne

    Sex & the iWorld

    Professor of Politics and The Richard L. Bready Chair for Ethics, Economics, and the Common Good at Saint Anselm College, Manchester, NH.

    In this blog I'm highlighting signposts of the world in which we presently reside as a means of helping promote a civil, and meaningful dialogue about what kind of world in which we wish to live. I am particularly interested in exploring how might we reconcile the individual good and the common good, and where reconciliation isn’t possible, which should take precedence and why.

    I also blog at Sharewik.com

    [Content Caution]

A New Civil Right

Posted by Dale Kuehne on May 24, 2010

Apparently school children now have the right to name brand condoms for free.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/05/20/AR2010052003980.html

The iWorld speaks for itself.

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2 Responses to “A New Civil Right”

  1. Lauren Fithian said

    Well–that’s certainly one of your more provocative (provoking?) and seriously misleading lead-ins. Over half of those “school children” are having sex whether you and I like it or not. While we work on promoting waiting until they are older many of those kids are having UNSAFE sex. Helping them to understand the wisdom and potential rewards of abstinence is great but it has to go alongside with aggressive public health measures to protect from HIV, etc…, and pregnancy. Denying that there is a need to assist with safety and pregnancy prevention amounts to reckless disregard for the safety and well-being of our young people.

    The “name brand” condoms are perceived as better by the sexually active young people using them–or who we hope will use them–and are only a few cents more. This is an important public health matter and does not have to do with some sort of “right” or civil right ?! to a free condom. Would we rather have more teens who are already having sex having protected sex, or those same teens having un-protected sex? Give them the Trojans and encourage them to use them. As a parent of teens five times over (three still in their teens) I would much rather assume my kids were having sex and act to protect them from HIV. The most effective way to do that is to have a hip young teacher at their schools make cool condoms readily available–just what this article is about. (Although, I’m pretty sure that my 17-yr-old who goes to Catholic high school cannot get free condoms at school!)

    I am very strongly morally opposed to abortion, and I certainly don’t wish an unintended pregnancy upon any teen. Teaching abstinence, and ignoring a strong public health issue while holding out for some future brighter day when teens stop having sex until they are older and in a committed relationship? I don’t believe that day has ever existed or will ever exist because having sex is one of the things humans do–especially young humans whose biology is designed for reproduction.

  2. Andrew Grenfell said

    What an intriguingly bald statement! I wrote a long entry disagreeing (the councils probably didn’t have any alternatives within their remit; to spend public money on condoms that won’t be used is madness), but what I find interesting on reflection is that for you the iWorld is a welfare state, of sorts, which defends and defines rights through paternalistic state intervention.

    The irony here is of course that it is a funny kind of paternalism that refuses to judge teen sexual behaviour morally, while implicitly making a judgement of moral irresponsibility in distributing free condoms.

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